sketchbook recap

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ceramic research institute

so many posts to catch up on.  this is my first short term residency and while i’m thrilled about how much i was able to get done, i especially cannot wait to share all the little details with everyone.

today, finally, i was able to visit the shiga prefectural shigaraki ceramic research institute, a separate entity from the ceramic cultural park where i am doing my residency.  there are students studying ceramics full time there but it is also open to the public.  meaghan brought up wanting to look for glaze recipes on one of the first days i was here and today we finally made it there.

i’m not a huge glaze person but o.m.g.  once we had signed in we went upstairs to a relatively small room filled with shelves.  which were filled with file boxes filled with cardboard sheets filled with test tiles.  triaxle blends, line blends, some with recipes, others with kiln schedules attached.  it was out of control.

as you flip through you might notice that some images are upside down.  i was just going crazy with my phone trying to get as much data as possible in each frame in hopes of translating some of the recipes.

field trip.

meal that another american artist and i threw together the other night.

i’m on a mission to learn some proper japanese cooking, this is my attempt at miso soup.

some in progress works, i think i will have a pretty substantial installation or these by the end…

saturday i headed out to kyoto with 2 of the other artists. i had seen some of these sites before (with parents, benny, masa) but despite the droves of us tourists they are still amazingly beautiful and great to see again.

kiyomizudera, i think that translates to pure water temple, but don’t hold me to it. you can, intriguingly, pay a couple hundred yen to take off your shoes, walk into the temple and into complete blackness (you have a rail to hold which leads you around), around a spiral and into a room with a large stone. if you place your hand on this stone you can make a wish. this dark place is considered the womb of the temple. 🙂

star leaves.

turtles.

shopping street.

meaghan, an artist from cali, with some maikos on the streets of kyoto.

shizuka, who is working at the togei no mori for a whole year, modeling a hat in a small shop.

kinkakuji, the golden temple.

ship shaped giant bonzai…

cool trees.

after the golden temple we went to another famous site, ryoenji, which is a temple and a zen rock garden.  i didn’t take any pictures, because i was busy talking with shizuka about art and happiness.  i hope to post pics and some discussion with several of the artists working at the togei no mori in this blog so keep an eye out.

anyway, on the way back to the car…wait for it…..

2 words, cat cafe.

CAT CAFE!? i didn’t go in. but i wanted to …..

day two (and a half?)

making work, museum and wondering around the grounds. day two felt busy, but i also feel like i got a lot done.  one of the other residents commented on how fast i was working and  as those who share a studio with me in florida know, that doesn’t happen often!

natural history museum drawing field trip part 2: birds

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the specimens in the bird section are preserved as “study skins” and not (usually) as taxidermy specimens.  the bones and organs are removed (except for the skeletal structure of the legs and wings).  the wings are kept folded, the  body cavity and head are stuffed with cotton and then the specimens are allowed to dry. it was out of control to see all those beautiful specimens lined up on trays.  some people joked “i want them all!”  i don’t know what it is about the translucent color, the old fashioned patterns.  i ended up drawing an extinct flicker (relative of the wood pecker).

unfortunately i didn’t get a picture of the ostrich skeleton kalina was drawing.

Paul whoozy what?

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while on the fastest trip to the northeast ever, i got a chance to stop by the paul clay show at salon 94.  i had heard about it on facebook of course.  people loving it and hating it.  I didn’t really know what to think so i was happy to see it in person.  ken price and ron nagle had small pieces up front.  They were pretty much the only things on individual pedestals.  i LOVED seeing those nagle’s.  he is such a bad ass.  the effort of glaze experimentation is evident, and captivating.  his craftsmanship is strong.  and there he is next to…..i don’t know.  dozens of sculptures and vessels placed on low pedestals or on shelves in a small room.   i felt kind of like i was at a thrift store, sifting through discarded items for treasures to take home.  there were some super tight, clean vessels and jewelry next to a pile of naively executed apples and balls of clay.  i guess that it may have been the curators idea of cleverness, to place work with such seemingly different motivations side by side.  perhaps this clean, probably mass produced piece of porcelain jewelry is nicer than this messy pinch bowl?  but what are the artist’s intentions?  is the jewelry devoid of content?  and what’s this kurt weiser doing here hidden amongst everything else? 

did anyone else see the show?

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